medication and the Tamaskan

All topics pertaining to health and diseases that may affect your Tamaskan Dog, as well as treatment.
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Lokipokie
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medication and the Tamaskan

Post by Lokipokie » Wed Mar 22, 2017 8:15 am

Dear readers, greetings from the Netherlands.

Since two weeks Loke is living with us. A male Tamaskan
, almost 10 months old.

Before Loke we had two portugese mountain dogs.

I have some questions concerning the health from a Tamaskan.

I've heard that they can react on narcosis. Do you people know more medication or treatment that can cause harm to a Tamaskan.

Loke is healthy but I want to know these things in advantage in case of emergency etc.

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Sylvaen
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Re: medication and the Tamaskan

Post by Sylvaen » Wed Mar 22, 2017 9:26 am

Lokipokie wrote:I've heard that they can react on narcosis.
I think it is extremely rare. I've heard a few stories about wolfdogs reacting badly (or not waking up from anesthesia) so it's important to only use a very low dosage of sedative but I think these random reactions can happen to any dog of any breed, much like with us humans: sometimes there is a small risk of reaction. Thankfully I've never had any issues with our Tamaskan Dogs but it's definitely good to always be aware. :)
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Lokipokie
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Re: medication and the Tamaskan

Post by Lokipokie » Wed Mar 22, 2017 11:37 am

Thank you for the reply

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arianwenarie
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Re: medication and the Tamaskan

Post by arianwenarie » Fri Mar 24, 2017 4:29 am

Sylvaen wrote:
Lokipokie wrote:I've heard that they can react on narcosis.
I think it is extremely rare. I've heard a few stories about wolfdogs reacting badly (or not waking up from anesthesia) so it's important to only use a very low dosage of sedative but I think these random reactions can happen to any dog of any breed, much like with us humans: sometimes there is a small risk of reaction. Thankfully I've never had any issues with our Tamaskan Dogs but it's definitely good to always be aware. :)
Does the MDR1 test provide any info on drug sensitivity of this kind?

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Sylvaen
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Re: medication and the Tamaskan

Post by Sylvaen » Fri Mar 24, 2017 2:27 pm

arianwenarie wrote:Does the MDR1 test provide any info on drug sensitivity of this kind?
Yes, it can... but not always.

For instance, Umbra (German Shepherd X Alaskan Malamute) is MDR1 clear:
https://www.mydogdna.com/crm/index.html ... /disorders
Yet she is our only dog (not a Tamaskan) that had a bad reaction to sedation: as soon as she was injected, instant reaction, she started screaming and struggling as if panicking or in pain. The vet immediately injected her with a different type of sedative and it knocked her out cold. Once the morning surgery was over (HD surgery + spay) she woke up extremely groggy and it took several hours for the effects of the anesthesia to wear off completely... she was whining (not from pain as she was given pain medication but, rather, just from confusion) and she stayed lethargic until that evening.
Multi-drug resistance 1 (MDR1) is a genetic mutation that alters a dog's ability to limit the absorption and distribution of many drugs. Affected dogs are slower to eliminate drugs from the body and can suffer side effects when exposed to certain medications. This mutation is sometimes also called "ivermectin sensitivity". However, the name is a misnomer as several other drugs pose a risk to MDR1 positive dogs. Adverse reactions can occur when affected dogs are exposed to some common drugs such as acepromazine, butorphanol, and macrocyclic lactones. However, all FDA approved heartworm preventatives are safe to administer to MDR1 positive dogs. This mutation is inherited in a dominant fashion though dogs with two copies of the mutation will exhibit more severe clinical signs.
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