Is a Tamaskan a good fit?

Everything about Tamaskan Dogs that does not fit within the other topics in this section.
Post Reply
th365thli
Tamthusiastic (Newbie)
Tamthusiastic (Newbie)
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Mar 01, 2016 12:13 pm
Location: California

Is a Tamaskan a good fit?

Post by th365thli » Tue Mar 01, 2016 10:57 pm

Hi,

I've been a doing a lot of research and thinking on Tamaskan puppies and whether I would be able to provide a good environment for them. Was wondering about your guy's opinion on my situation:

1. I live in California, the Bay Area. It doesn't get scorching hot like in LA but the summers can get hot.
2. I live in a house with a smallish back yard and side yards. The back and side yards are fenced in by a wooden slat fence with a wooden gate the same height. Something like this: http://kingwoodfence.com/wp-content/upl ... od-015.jpg. Unfortunately the fence is not 6 feet high. It's actually slightly shorter, around 5'8" or 5'9"
3. Despite the small yard, I do have an active lifestyle, and I live in an area that is conducive to that lifestyle. I fish, kayak, longboard, and hike. There's a park in my neighborhood and countless others around town.
4. This will be my FIRST dog
5. No children in the house. I do have two young adult roommates like myself (so 3 person house).
6. The biggest obstacle. I work full-time. Not strictly 9-5. I get to work around 10, 10:30, get home by 5:45 ish (actually really blessed to have a job like this with these hours). I'm also have generous work from home opportunities. I know the cruelest thing you can do to a dog, let alone a puppy, is to leave it home for an extended amount of time. If I were to get any pup, I would take a month vacation or a month combined vacation and WFH to stay be with the puppy. After the first month I would come home from lunch at work to play with the puppy a bit and go back to work. Would this schedule be enough?

The biggest question, at least in my mind, isn't effort or money. I know taking care of a puppy is intense. It's pretty much like taking care of a human baby. I've researched costs of food, vet bills, toys, doggy day care every now and then etc. My biggest concern is keeping the dog adequate company.

User avatar
rhadamant
Tamthusiastic (Newbie)
Tamthusiastic (Newbie)
Posts: 49
Joined: Sun Aug 10, 2014 1:45 am
Location: Cali, USA

Re: Is a Tamaskan a good fit?

Post by rhadamant » Thu Mar 03, 2016 10:22 am

To answer your biggest question, its a bit of a gamble. I've got two Tamaskans and one (Echo) has a lot of separation anxiety and gets a little destructive when left alone, the other (Tusk) is totally okay with being left alone. Sometimes the breeder can give you a heads up if their pairing will be better suited for separation, other times its just a roll of a die.

User avatar
Katlin
Tamificent (Guru)
Tamificent (Guru)
Posts: 2739
Joined: Sun Mar 27, 2011 12:48 am
Location: Calgary, AB
Contact:

Re: Is a Tamaskan a good fit?

Post by Katlin » Thu Mar 03, 2016 5:20 pm

th365thli wrote:Hi,

I've been a doing a lot of research and thinking on Tamaskan puppies and whether I would be able to provide a good environment for them. Was wondering about your guy's opinion on my situation:

1. I live in California, the Bay Area. It doesn't get scorching hot like in LA but the summers can get hot.
2. I live in a house with a smallish back yard and side yards. The back and side yards are fenced in by a wooden slat fence with a wooden gate the same height. Something like this: http://kingwoodfence.com/wp-content/upl ... od-015.jpg. Unfortunately the fence is not 6 feet high. It's actually slightly shorter, around 5'8" or 5'9"
3. Despite the small yard, I do have an active lifestyle, and I live in an area that is conducive to that lifestyle. I fish, kayak, longboard, and hike. There's a park in my neighborhood and countless others around town.
4. This will be my FIRST dog
5. No children in the house. I do have two young adult roommates like myself (so 3 person house).
6. The biggest obstacle. I work full-time. Not strictly 9-5. I get to work around 10, 10:30, get home by 5:45 ish (actually really blessed to have a job like this with these hours). I'm also have generous work from home opportunities. I know the cruelest thing you can do to a dog, let alone a puppy, is to leave it home for an extended amount of time. If I were to get any pup, I would take a month vacation or a month combined vacation and WFH to stay be with the puppy. After the first month I would come home from lunch at work to play with the puppy a bit and go back to work. Would this schedule be enough?

The biggest question, at least in my mind, isn't effort or money. I know taking care of a puppy is intense. It's pretty much like taking care of a human baby. I've researched costs of food, vet bills, toys, doggy day care every now and then etc. My biggest concern is keeping the dog adequate company.
I'll answer with my own experiences with my Tamaskan Wylie (from Sierra Tamaskan).

1. Wylie can make it up to +35*C. We do have an AC, a puppy pool, and a cooling mat for him and that helps him cope. He is not allowed for longer then 15 minutes in that heat without some sort of cooling device. He does not like anything above 25*C for longer than a few minutes. Remember these are arctic breeds. I do know of several Tamaskans in Cali though.

2. I have a 6 foot fence with 3 foot gates. Wylie has only gone over the gate once when a lady was egging him on and had a schnauzer barking at him. He was also left outside (I was not home). I has never happened again, so I personally haven't had problems with a shorter fence.

3. I taught Wylie to trot beside the longboard when he was about 6 months, then to run in front and pull when he was 1.5 years. It's very very sketchy without breaks! We've since switched to scootering.

4. Personally I found Wylie eager to learn but difficult to train. He was sometimes interested, but always smart and he knew that he didn't have to train for longer periods of time. When I pushed it he pushed back and got frustrated. I personally found him similar to training a husky. Others can compete in obedience with their dog and still others have very food driven dogs. Mine is none of those....

5. Make sure they know about the fur, and are all 100% ok with getting this dog.

6. I was not be able to work a "regular" full time job with my dog when he was a puppy until I got him a pet sitter. I had a job that I could bring him to work but unfortunately ended up leaving. I was stuck getting a different job working 10-12 hour shifts at an emerg vet clinic. My friend had no job at the time so I paid her to watch Wylie every day. She brought him to her house 5 days a week and allowed him to play with her dogs for the full 10-12 hours I was gone. It was horrendous that I couldn't spend time with him, but I was very lucky that she loved him and cared for him.

Now I currently work about 4-6 hours a day as a full-time groomer. I groom about 4-5 dogs a day and have my own business which I am contracted out to a salon that's about 5 minutes from my house. They have a daycare attached which allows me to bring Wylie in the morning, or go pick him up after work and let him get some energy out with the remaining daycare dogs. My roommate cared for him while I was on vacation and he was left alone for 8 hours. He's ok to do that now in my room without a kennel, but he's three and has calmed down significantly. Wylie does NOT have separation anxiety anymore, but when he was kennelled he did to such an extreme that he caused several moderate injuries to himself.

Be prepared that your puppy may hate the kennel. Have many backup plans. Will your housemates have any part of raising this puppy? Will they be able to let the puppy outside? In MY opinion, anything longer than an hour is too long for a puppy under 5 months old to be left kennelled.
Polarose Tamaskan
Polardog Outfitters
Owner of Sierra Kaweah RN RI TDI TRN TTDN CRN-MCL @ Polarose

th365thli
Tamthusiastic (Newbie)
Tamthusiastic (Newbie)
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Mar 01, 2016 12:13 pm
Location: California

Re: Is a Tamaskan a good fit?

Post by th365thli » Thu Mar 03, 2016 7:30 pm

Thanks for the informative responses!

Quick question, what does kennelled mean exactly? As in they're left by themselves? Or left with other dogs?

User avatar
Katlin
Tamificent (Guru)
Tamificent (Guru)
Posts: 2739
Joined: Sun Mar 27, 2011 12:48 am
Location: Calgary, AB
Contact:

Re: Is a Tamaskan a good fit?

Post by Katlin » Thu Mar 03, 2016 8:27 pm

Kennelled means locked in a crate
Polarose Tamaskan
Polardog Outfitters
Owner of Sierra Kaweah RN RI TDI TRN TTDN CRN-MCL @ Polarose

User avatar
rhadamant
Tamthusiastic (Newbie)
Tamthusiastic (Newbie)
Posts: 49
Joined: Sun Aug 10, 2014 1:45 am
Location: Cali, USA

Re: Is a Tamaskan a good fit?

Post by rhadamant » Fri Mar 04, 2016 6:51 pm

I'll take a crack at the rest of your questions so you can contrast and compare with Katlin. One of my dogs is actually a half sister to her dog (Same Dam)

1. My Tamaskans grew up in the high desert east of LA. It get's super hot here. In the winter they're fine, but in the summer everyone's getting air conditioned. (I'm moving to northern New England in a few months, so that'll help)

2. Echo, my older Tamaskan (not Wylie's half sister) is an agility dog. I've got a ~7 foot brick wall surrounding my backyard. She could scale this easily, but I never encouraged it so she doesn't. Like Katlin said, unless they're being told to jump over it or being egged on it's unlikely that they'll even bother.

3. My sister lives in Berkeley and I've brought Echo up to visit before (before Tusk was born). The bay area is very dog friendly, outside patios where you can eat and bring your dog, lots of parks, hikes, etc. In my opinion it's a fine place to raise one.

4. I'm sure you know parents who freaked out about they first child and by their second they were completely different, relaxed and at least? Well dogs are really no different, first time dog owners are often so busy trying to do everything by the book that they fail to enjoy raising the dog. The more you read and prepare ahead of time the more pleasant it'll be being a first time owner. Also, keep in mind that puppies are a total nightmare and you'll get very little sleep for the first few months, probably coupled with regret and anger. Don't worry, it's worth it.

5. Make sure you're roommates are totally on board with helping you train. If you put work in to discipline your dog, they can just as easily undo your work. E.G. You train your dog not to beg at the table but your roommates feed him/her scraps.

6. I work from home full time. My two Tamaskans would have been VERY hard to leave alone until they were roughly half a year old, give or take a few weeks. The best thing you can do is to take off from work, like you've planned, and do all the core training ASAP (Potty Training, Crate Training, Obedience, etc). Once you're back at work and not working from home you'll probably need to have a dog walker or sitter come at least once a day. If you're housemates can help, that works too, but if they can't you'll likely have to go Katlin's route and pay someone.

th365thli
Tamthusiastic (Newbie)
Tamthusiastic (Newbie)
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Mar 01, 2016 12:13 pm
Location: California

Re: Is a Tamaskan a good fit?

Post by th365thli » Fri Mar 04, 2016 11:04 pm

Thank you guys so much for the advice! It seems the first 4 months are the hardest and the most costly. Definitely something to think about. Hiring a pet sitter everyday would get pretty expensive.

User avatar
Katlin
Tamificent (Guru)
Tamificent (Guru)
Posts: 2739
Joined: Sun Mar 27, 2011 12:48 am
Location: Calgary, AB
Contact:

Re: Is a Tamaskan a good fit?

Post by Katlin » Sat Mar 05, 2016 8:57 am

I'd say the first year is the hardest actually.

They are expensive dogs. Wylie had runny stools for about 6 months, I tried several dozen brands of kibble trying to figure it out as well as hundreds of dollars in fecals and vet testing as well as probiotics (fortiflora and gastro food saved his butt). The consensus? He had a sensitive stomach :roll: I have since found that raw is much more expensive but easier. Wylie is one of the pickiest eaters I've ever met. If I buy a box of raw that's all the same flavour he'll turn his nose up at it, wasting lots of money. I have to buy a box that are random flavours of proteins :roll: such a naughty boof.
Polarose Tamaskan
Polardog Outfitters
Owner of Sierra Kaweah RN RI TDI TRN TTDN CRN-MCL @ Polarose

User avatar
nyodenyo
Tamthusiastic (Newbie)
Tamthusiastic (Newbie)
Posts: 36
Joined: Tue Nov 03, 2015 12:17 am
Location: France
Contact:

Re: Is a Tamaskan a good fit?

Post by nyodenyo » Sat Mar 05, 2016 6:15 pm

Katlin wrote:I'd say the first year is the hardest actually.

They are expensive dogs. Wylie had runny stools for about 6 months, I tried several dozen brands of kibble trying to figure it out as well as hundreds of dollars in fecals and vet testing as well as probiotics (fortiflora and gastro food saved his butt). The consensus? He had a sensitive stomach :roll: I have since found that raw is much more expensive but easier. Wylie is one of the pickiest eaters I've ever met. If I buy a box of raw that's all the same flavour he'll turn his nose up at it, wasting lots of money. I have to buy a box that are random flavours of proteins :roll: such a naughty boof.
This is so true XD
Almost everything you just said happened to me, and I have my boy since only 2 months!
He was really sick because of a gastro, has to hopitalize him 2 days because he was completely deshydrated, and when he was better, we tried a lot of kibbles before finding the one he loves.

Pups cost a lot of money, and a lot of time! If I wasn't working at home, and having an oldest dog already (and the dogs knowledge), I would never have adopted a tam. ^^

(Sorry for my bad english, I hope I'm not too out of topic ^^")

User avatar
Katlin
Tamificent (Guru)
Tamificent (Guru)
Posts: 2739
Joined: Sun Mar 27, 2011 12:48 am
Location: Calgary, AB
Contact:

Re: Is a Tamaskan a good fit?

Post by Katlin » Sat Mar 05, 2016 9:50 pm

Naw your english is superb!

Actually I had $5000 saved for Wylie for the first year of his life. It was all spent within 4 months on vet bills and different foods. Errg!
Polarose Tamaskan
Polardog Outfitters
Owner of Sierra Kaweah RN RI TDI TRN TTDN CRN-MCL @ Polarose

User avatar
rosemont
Tamthusiastic (Newbie)
Tamthusiastic (Newbie)
Posts: 50
Joined: Thu Nov 19, 2015 2:28 am
Location: UK

Re: Is a Tamaskan a good fit?

Post by rosemont » Sun Mar 06, 2016 11:41 pm

Katlin wrote:Actually I had $5000 saved for Wylie for the first year of his life. It was all spent within 4 months on vet bills and different foods. Errg!
Wow, did you not have insurance?

User avatar
Katlin
Tamificent (Guru)
Tamificent (Guru)
Posts: 2739
Joined: Sun Mar 27, 2011 12:48 am
Location: Calgary, AB
Contact:

Re: Is a Tamaskan a good fit?

Post by Katlin » Mon Mar 07, 2016 4:55 am

Sure did, but they were all small claims and my deductible was over the price for each visit.
Polarose Tamaskan
Polardog Outfitters
Owner of Sierra Kaweah RN RI TDI TRN TTDN CRN-MCL @ Polarose

User avatar
rosemont
Tamthusiastic (Newbie)
Tamthusiastic (Newbie)
Posts: 50
Joined: Thu Nov 19, 2015 2:28 am
Location: UK

Re: Is a Tamaskan a good fit?

Post by rosemont » Wed Mar 09, 2016 8:18 pm

That really sucks omg, it's a good job you had that money saved :')

Post Reply