Breeding Tamaskans

Everything about Tamaskan Dogs that does not fit within the other topics in this section.
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ckendrick06
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Breeding Tamaskans

Post by ckendrick06 » Fri Mar 20, 2015 1:12 am

Hi, I'm new here and I'm trying to learn everything I can about the Tamaskan breed. I have read the TDR website (and multiple other websites), visited breeders sites and facebook pages and have messaged a few breeders/owners with questions so I have a good overall picture of the breed (and I'm totally in love!!). What I am interested in now is the breeding of Tamaskans. What does the future look like for Tamaskans? With a somewhat limited breeding pool what is everyone working on right now? I understand that they are accepted by the ARBA/CK (very exciting!) but as a relatively new breed where do you all see the Tamaskans in 5 years? 10 years?

I am thinking about becoming a breeder in the future but I want to make sure that I know all that I can before I take that leap. I've read about the testing requirements (and totally agree with them) and I've looked at the breeding dogs/puppies that I could find (they're all gorgeous!) but I cannot look at everyone's pedigrees so can anyone tell me how closely the Tamaskans in the US are related? It seems like it might be difficult to keep the dogs from becoming too closely related. When it does become time to purchase my first puppy would I be better off importing from another country? I have a million other questions but I'll save them for later. Thanks in advance!!


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Re: Breeding Tamaskans

Post by HiTenshi16 » Fri Mar 20, 2015 4:09 pm

Before getting into the idea of breeding, you must ask yourself why it interests you. Is it for money, because it makes cute puppies, or because your dog is just sweet and you think there should be more like it, or because of your interest in the genetics behind them, trying to help perfect to the ideal breed standard. One thing to keep in mind, breeding dogs is best as a hobby, because like any hobby can be expensive and you are more likely to lose money breeding than make profit. You have to take into consideration that cost of all the testing you will do to see if your pup/planned pair are eligible for breeding or if they end up failing. Then there is when puppies are born, will you be ready should there be any complications with the dam like a puppy getting stuck and requiring c-section, or worse. Also how much money you must put in to properly feeding all the puppies and mother, constant cleaning up, routine vet checks, ect. Then if all goes well, will you be able to watch the new puppies go to their news homes, are you prepared to take puppies/dogs back should anything go wrong with their adopted families.

Not trying to scare you off, but just warn about how there is so much to take into consideration before deciding to breed. Not saying you have not, but this also goes for anyone else interested in the idea.

Many of the dogs in the US are related through a few different lines, some crossing and finding it harder to find a suitable mate that does not have a same grandparent or great grandparents. There is also the issue of some being carriers for certain things, so even if not closely related, still can not be mated together because both are carriers. You will want to research the database http://www.tamaskan-database.com so you can learn who is related to who.
A few breeders are seeking outcrosses to be approved to be added to the Tamaskan breeding lines to help improve on the standard, health, temperaments, and overall genetic diversity. What the breed will be like in 5 or 10 years? Hard to say with having to add in new outcrosses often with this breed still growing and developing. There may be some steps back, a line might end, or we might get closer to better dogs who fit the standard.

This will take LOTS of research on your part.
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Re: Breeding Tamaskans

Post by Katlin » Fri Mar 20, 2015 7:13 pm

When it comes to breeding as well, remember that sometimes things don't work out. I had been planning to breed for 5+ years, got my puppy, and his second testicle didn't drop. He's a fantastic pet...but now I have to pay $700+ to have him neutered and my plans of breeder are shattered until I import another tamaskan.

You should have researched this breed for at least a year if not more before you get a puppy specifically for breeding.

Something to keep in mind.
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ckendrick06
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Re: Breeding Tamaskans

Post by ckendrick06 » Sat Mar 21, 2015 12:23 am

Thank you for both of your answers :) Just to put this out there, I have no intention of jumping into this lightly. I do have a background in dogs and it is now time for to start my dream of becoming a breeder. I have been researching breeding dogs for years and I want to be a breeder to better the breed. I am fascinated with genetics. I have been a breeder (of other animals) before but dogs are what I am truly in love with. Right now I am researching a few different breeds trying to figure out which one will fit me and my family the best. I want to make sure that I know what I am getting into with each breed. Honestly, it is only the Tamaskan breed that I am new to. The Tamaskan is a unique challenge due to the fact that it is a breed that is essentially unfinished. The breed that you guys have today looks beautiful and has wonderful traits but there is still work left to do (according to all of the posts that I have read, anyway). Tamaskan breeders have a future that is wide open and not hemmed in by kennel club regulations. I understand that you all have your own regulations that you have set up but you are open to bringing in outcrosses (that are approved obviously) and making the changes in the breed that you all deem necessary. From what I have seen so far this seems like a really good group of people that truly love their breed, want what it is best for the Tamaskans and are willing to work together to make that happen. I think that is really great. I am not interested in getting into this hobby as a way to make money. I am a stay at home mom with six kids that I home school and whatever breed we choose we will be doing this as a family.

I did not know about the tamaskan database, thank you for that link. I'll be checking that out asap! :)

As for my question about the future of the breed, I truly want to know the tiny details. I saw a post from a few years back about someone who was inquiring about the future of the breed and several breeders posted specific details about their dogs that they would like to see changed. For example there are some tails that had a curl and ears that were too large. Some people wanted their dog's coat to be different. I was just wondering if anyone would be willing to do that again? I am interested in seeing what/if any changes have been made and what changes people are trying to still make regarding body,temperament and/or color.

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Re: Breeding Tamaskans

Post by Katlin » Sat Mar 21, 2015 3:42 am

Oh sure :D

In my opinion I'd like to see
- Healthier dogs. Yes the guys we have are healthy but I'd like to see less DM carriers, less addisons, and less epilepsy (which we are doing fairly well with, I think).
- I'd like to see more of a standard size, we have dogs like Wylie and Zephyr who are medium, dogs like (can't think of his name!!) who is teeny, and dogs like Nanuq (not tdr) who is enormous
- Some dogs need more leg
- Some dogs need less leg and more muscle
- I'd like to see shorter tails and less curl
- Smaller and better furred ears
- Fluffier coats. Personally I think that is one thing Wylie has that is perfect - a not too fluffy not too skimpy coat
- More trainability across the board. Some are excellent and can be service dogs, some are couch potatoes who couldn't care less about anything, and some are bat-shit nuts and want to run run chase that squirrel!
- I'd like to see lighter eyes as well

That's MY opinion :D
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