New member with a few questions.

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TamaskNor
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New member with a few questions.

Post by TamaskNor » Mon Jan 27, 2014 5:55 am

Hello everyone!

I have a few questions about the Tamaskan as I am 99.9% sure that I am getting one. I just want answers to a few questions that will make me 100% sure.

1. I read somewhere on the mighty internet that a problem with the Tamaskan (and other types) was inbreeding. Now I know that inbreeding does not cause genetic diseases on its own. It can on the other hand cause lower fertility, vitality as well as lower the life expectancy. Would you say this is a "problem" with the Tamaskan? Are there family trees you would be able to look at before getting one?.

2. My family owns a lot of land that are currently used for hunting deer. Would you say the Tamaskan has what it takes to be a good hunting dog or does he lack something that does not make him the ideal dog for hunting? (This part will not have an effect on my decision if I want to get one or not, I'm just curious).

3. I have read that the Tamaskan does not like to be alone and that he is a pack animal by nature. Do I have to expect coming home from work every day to a mess, or is this only if I dont give him enough attention otherwise and give him enough exercise?

4. Though my family has had dog now for 9 years, and one before that when I was little, this will be the first dog that I alone have full responsability for. Now I know there is no perfect "first time dog" but how would you rate the Tamaskan for being someone's first dog?

5. Getting a dog, and having a dog is costly, I know. But I have not seen a clear answer as to how much a Tamaskan puppy from a good breeder would cost.

6. About what some website (which shall remain unnamed) have said about the Tamaskan dog and about the TDS and such. Is there proven to be wolf in all of the dogs? Or is this just some cases. Wolfdogs are currently illegal in Norway, so I would be unable to get one if that is the case.

I'm sure I will have more questions, and I'm sure you will give me information that I forgot to ask/think about.

Thanks for taking the time to read/reply :)

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martinbernstein
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Re: New member with a few questions.

Post by martinbernstein » Mon Jan 27, 2014 4:57 pm

Velkommen skal du vaere.

I have a question- why would you use a dog to hunt deer? Roedeer, in my experience, don't react the way a bull moose does to a barking dog. Deer will just run until they can't run anymore. Tamaskans are fast and have great endurance and would run a roedeer down eventually, but could end up kilometers away. The deer would suffer a terrible death. Anyway, isn't it illegal to hunt deer with dogs in Norway.

Back to some of your other questions- I believe that my Tamaskan was much happier when I got a second dog a year later. She no longer suffers from severe separation anxiety.

You live in a good place for a tam. However, unless you train extensively on recall, and are lucky with the puppy you get, I would not trust the tam of leash. I used to let Froya off leash but stopped after she ran away for 12 hours twice and killed five of my chickens.

If you live an active lifestyle and you give the tam lots of things to do, and a dog friend (if you can) i think you should consider getting one. Keep in mind that Norway has strict regulations regarding wolf content dogs so make sure to do your homework. Many tams have traceable recent wolf genetics.

Lykke til.

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martinbernstein
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Re: New member with a few questions.

Post by martinbernstein » Mon Jan 27, 2014 5:01 pm

And to answer your other questions- yes, your home will look like a mess even if you do give them plenty of excercise. Remove garbage, books, CDs and anything else they will want to explore! Every day I come home and find something chewed on.

Finally, my Tamaskan was my first dog. It was agood first time dog for me only because I got it specifically for the lifestyle I live- I hike, ski, and spend most of my free time outdoors. A suburban family getting a tam as their first dog will likely not handle it as well as for example a lab or retriever.

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Re: New member with a few questions.

Post by Miran » Mon Jan 27, 2014 5:15 pm

You can always ask the pedigrees by the breeders. If they don't show them don't trust them. Some can be seen online.

Yes they are absolute packmembers but the mess martin describe.....I really do not know that because I almost always at home and when I am not often someone else is and for the short times nobody is they are in a crate.

@Martin Funny because Sierra Freya's sister never demolish something as the only one here....hahaha funny how different they can be ;)

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Re: New member with a few questions.

Post by HiTenshi16 » Mon Jan 27, 2014 5:36 pm

TamaskNor wrote:1. I read somewhere on the mighty internet that a problem with the Tamaskan (and other types) was inbreeding. Now I know that inbreeding does not cause genetic diseases on its own. It can on the other hand cause lower fertility, vitality as well as lower the life expectancy. Would you say this is a "problem" with the Tamaskan? Are there family trees you would be able to look at before getting one?.
Actually, inbreeding does cause genetic diseases. Because some of the foundation dogs were inbred from some Utonagan lines, (but not limited to just the lines from Utonagan), there is Epilespy, Addison's Disease, renal or kidney issues, cataracts, and hip dysplasia. You can view this website http://www.tamaskan-database.com to see who has common ancestors.
TamaskNor wrote:2. My family owns a lot of land that are currently used for hunting deer. Would you say the Tamaskan has what it takes to be a good hunting dog or does he lack something that does not make him the ideal dog for hunting? (This part will not have an effect on my decision if I want to get one or not, I'm just curious).
I do not believe a Tamaskan would make a good hunting dog, nor would I want to see it as one. There are breeders trying to lower the prey drive so to better off leash recall. I would not see it because I would hate to hear of someone's Tamaskan getting shot because someone had mistaken it for a wolf. I'm sure others can say why they believe if a Tamaskan would make a decent hunting dog or not.
TamaskNor wrote:3. I have read that the Tamaskan does not like to be alone and that he is a pack animal by nature. Do I have to expect coming home from work every day to a mess, or is this only if I dont give him enough attention otherwise and give him enough exercise?
Because the breed is still new, each dog will vary. Some suffer from separation anxiety, others don't. It can depend on how much you exercise them mentally and physically, or it might not help at all depending on the individual case.
TamaskNor wrote:4. Though my family has had dog now for 9 years, and one before that when I was little, this will be the first dog that I alone have full responsability for. Now I know there is no perfect "first time dog" but how would you rate the Tamaskan for being someone's first dog?
The Tamaskan is my first time dog, and now I have two. Most will probably say that this is not a first time dog. But again, this varies on each individual dog.
TamaskNor wrote:5. Getting a dog, and having a dog is costly, I know. But I have not seen a clear answer as to how much a Tamaskan puppy from a good breeder would cost.
This is because it is different from breeder to breeder, and also if you import or get on closer. There is no set price for all breeders to go by and you would have to ask each breeder what their price is (and don't forget to ask why they have it at that price and what is included).
I live in the US and for my girl whom I hope to breed cost around $2,000.00. My boy whom I got as a pet only and imported cost me around $3,000.00.
TamaskNor wrote:6. About what some website (which shall remain unnamed) have said about the Tamaskan dog and about the TDS and such. Is there proven to be wolf in all of the dogs? Or is this just some cases. Wolfdogs are currently illegal in Norway, so I would be unable to get one if that is the case.
Unfortunately, some of the breed founders have lied about the use of wolf content in the Tamaskan. The content now is so little, it will not matter anymore in some lines. The database link I gave above will also list what breed each dog is and you can see how far back a wolfdog known as Ivan or Boogie is.
Image

Miran
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Re: New member with a few questions.

Post by Miran » Tue Jan 28, 2014 8:58 am

This is the link to the foundation dogs ;)
http://www.tamaskan-database.com/the-ta ... ation-dogs

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Re: New member with a few questions.

Post by balto13 » Tue Jan 28, 2014 11:14 am

HiTenshi16 wrote:
TamaskNor wrote:2. My family owns a lot of land that are currently used for hunting deer. Would you say the Tamaskan has what it takes to be a good hunting dog or does he lack something that does not make him the ideal dog for hunting? (This part will not have an effect on my decision if I want to get one or not, I'm just curious).
I do not believe a Tamaskan would make a good hunting dog, nor would I want to see it as one. There are breeders trying to lower the prey drive so to better off leash recall. I would not see it because I would hate to hear of someone's Tamaskan getting shot because someone had mistaken it for a wolf. I'm sure others can say why they believe if a Tamaskan would make a decent hunting dog or not.
There is a wolfy looking dog that is great for hunting, or so I have been told by a breeder in the US, and it's the west siberian laika. Though, I would be hesitant to use a wolfy looking dog for hunting for the same reason HiTenshi mentioned. Recently, in the US, a weimaraner was shot by a hunter O__o. I guess every hunting dog runs the risk of "accidentally getting shot", but wolfy might be a littler higher in said risk. My two cents ^_^

TamaskNor
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Re: New member with a few questions.

Post by TamaskNor » Wed Jan 29, 2014 3:13 am

Thanks for all the input guys. And you're absolutely right, Martin. Minor "brainfart" on my part.

I'd like to specify that I myself am not much of a hunter, but my "father-in-law" is and we had been talking about going together. Therefore my hunting dog question. But it doesnt matter at all in my decision overall.

I might just get 1 more dog (eventually) that I can use for hunting and since Tam's clearly do not like to be alone it would be great to have 1 more. :)

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